Jennifer Schultz : Art Within Her

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I like how Ms. Schultz puts it, and I agree that this is true for me, as a musician. She says, in referring to art, "I don't feel one decides to be an artist. It is something inside of you that needs to be released." Very well put! That is the essence of the art within, desiring to be expressed, desiring to be released.

From the sounds of things, Ms. Schultz found ways to express this art, from a young age, even if/when it was not particularly pleasing, referring to her choice of canvas. Please, read with me, and learn about Ms. Jennifer Schultz.

When did you first decide that you wanted to be an artist?

I don't feel one decides to be an artist. It is something inside of you that needs to be released. I started as a very young child creating large murals on the wall of my family members' rooms. My mom was not pleased about this and she encouraged me to work on paper. I remember writing the word "love" in large letters on my wooden closet door and getting in trouble at Pre-K for painting on the window. I guess I've always been interested in working outside the box.

What was your first art creation?

I would make large posters of drawings based on Richard Scarry book illustrations. My parents wanted me to have training so they hired a tutor who introduced me to watercolors and I created a painting of a bird in flight. I think I was about six.

What was your first memorable art piece?

My fist memorable show of work was in High School. I recreated some propaganda pieces from World War II. Even though they were not originals, it made me realize the power of art.

Please describe "A Day in the Life of Jennifer Schultz, Artist Extraordinaire."

My typical art process is just finding time to experiment with materials. I go out in the field and take pictures of the same spots over and over again. I will work on 3 or four panels at at time and collage the snapshots and recombine until I create a new image. After the work is done, I'll add a layer of epoxy resin. I look at websites to see if there are art shows I'd like to participate in or opportunities to work in unexpected places or installations. I think artists have to be very selective about where to show and I don't make work in response to a particular show theme. Typically, I make a lot of work at one time and then take some time to process ideas for the next series. I really never know what direction I will become interested in and I think it is important to allow yourself space to try new things. I like setting up situations where the outcomes are surprising.

What do you do with your art?

I am getting ready to move and will have a studio space attached to my house. I am excited to explore a new environment and to keep working and creating. I have a solo show at Zapow! gallery which will be up through July. I am featured in an online art blog (Brown Paper Bag) by Sara Barnes. She does a wonderful job highlighting amazing talent and hosts a scrap collage exchange in which I recently participated. Note: The links she mentions have since become invalid.[artInterview_linkReference01]

I like how Ms. Schultz puts it, and I agree that this is true for me, as a musician. She says, in referring to art, "I don't feel one decides to be an artist. It is something inside of you that needs to be released." Very well put! That is the essence of the art within, desiring to be expressed, desiring to be released.

What are your plans for the future?

I am always looking for opportunities to show the work in galleries and other art spaces or spaces that are atypical for art. I have a website and I show at a great gallery in Asheville North Carolina, called Zapow! I participate in group shows all over the country. I have donated art to certain causes I really believe in and think the arts are a great way to support charity.


In the words of Jennifer Schultz, from a site where she was featured (formerly from her main website), "In everydayness and banality I find rich subject matter. In my work I attach myself to the sweet grime of everyday. I see and feel the outskirts of things more than the things themselves. What some deem insignificant actually propels my process."

Connecting with Jennifer Schultz :

Blog :brwnpaperbag.com




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